Independent Photography

Occupy Ottawa: The morning after the eviction notice


Hello all,

Below are my thoughts on the occupy Ottawa movement, they have been shaped by my visits to the camp, my involvement with the occupy Ottawa media committee and conversations and interviews with people for and against the movement.  My interest was peaked by the inner journalist and my involvement was driven by the political science student in me.  I stepped away from the movement a few weeks ago because of how felt issues of harassment reported in the camp were being handled, and because I felt occupy Ottawa was failing to achieve what it had intended to do.  That and the ever mounting pressure of school and work.  However, with the eviction process started, it seemed time to take a look at the occupation again.

The nature of an occupation is never considered pleasant.  Typically an occupation implies the removal of rights from citizens native to a place by others from another place, usually imposing foreign values through force.  North America understands this concept because that is the nature of the foundation of our societies.  For all but a few, occupation is an unpleasant and oppressive thing.

The nature of the occupy movement is somewhat Marxist as it promotes class distinctions, are you in the 99% or the 1%?  The typical organization of each occupation in Canada has been anarchist in nature, promoting social organizational values of non-oppression, decentralization and consensus building.  In Canada at least, the occupy movement has been somewhat detached from the so-called ‘99%’ as a result.

In the United States, the middle class has been bullied by more than just the banks; for decades there has been the health care industry, insurance providers and their own government as well.  The United States is going through a period of self-awareness that Canada has either already experienced or has yet to experience.  Either way our middle class has not historically been hurt in the same way; while that is not the prevailing trend of the future for the Canadian middle class it is the pattern of the past.  Since the occupy movement draws support from the ‘99%’s’ experience of oppression at the hands of the ‘1%,’ for an occupation to be successful it requires the middle class of a society to feel oppressed.

Ottawa, ON - A passer by eyes a medical tent at Confederation park on Tuesday morning. Occupy Ottawa participants were served with eviction notices on Monday November 21, 2011. That night at a general assembly protestors voted to resist the eviction order, which took effect at 12am. While about 200 people were in the park at midnight to resist the eviction, by 8:30 the next morning only 10 people remained.

The Canadian middle class does not feel oppressed enough for occupations like those in the United States to work.  This has become apparent through the somewhat lackluster display of physical defense as evictions across Canada roll on.

We have not seen photos of riot police beating protestors in Canada because the cities and police forces have chosen to allow the movements to whither and then used tenancy law as a means to remove them whilst maintaining a positive public image.

This morning, the day after the National Capital Commission was supposed to evict everyone, and the day after the general assembly in which occupy Ottawa voted to resist, 10 or so people remained.  If occupy Ottawa and other so-called, ‘occupations’ want to remain relevant it may be time to pack up, regroup and reorganize.  I would suggest a start would be to change the name, as occupations have not been pleasant or positive things, historically.

Ottawa, ON - Five of the ten or so remaining protestors at the occupy site the morning after the eviction notices were handed out.  Monday protestors barricaded the fountain in the centre of the park ahead of an eviction which was supposed to take effect at 12am Tuesday morning.  While almost 200 hundred people were in the park at midnight to defend against the eviction most had left or were packing up following sunrise.

Ottawa, ON - Five of the ten or so remaining protestors at the occupy Ottawa campsite eat breakfast the morning after the eviction notices were handed out. Monday night protestors barricaded the fountain in the centre of the park ahead of an eviction which was supposed to take effect at 12am Tuesday morning. While almost 200 hundred people were in the park at midnight to defend against the eviction most had left or were packing up following sunrise.

It will be interesting to see occupy Ottawa and the NCC handles this in the coming days.

**The following photos were added a few hours later**

Ottawa, ON - Tents sit in front of the Elgin St courthouse in Confederation park on the morning of Tuesday November 22, 2011. The day before the National Capital Commission handed out eviction orders, that order took effect Tuesday morning at midnight. Close to 200 people were in the park at midnight to prevent the eviction, by 8:30 the next morning the police had not come and most of the protestors had left and dismantled their camps anyway.

Played around a bit with shooting into the sun, but I thought with the sun, tents and courthouse it said, “Morning, still there, law.”

Then I wandered around the camp a bit, it was quiet people were cleaning up.  I saw a few protestors playing with sticks like swords, so I took a few photos.

Ottawa, ON - A few occupy Ottawa participants take a break from dismantling structures to play fight with some wooden sticks on Tuesday morning. On Monday the National Capital Commission served occupy Ottawa with eviction notices, by Tuesday most tents had been dismantled and all but a few protestors had left the park.

After I turned back towards the courthouse and noticed some people taking some tents down, so I snapped a few photos, I liked this one.

Ottawa, ON - A protestor dismantles her campsite on the morning of Tuesday November 22, 2011. On Monday the National Capital Commission served occupy Ottawa with eviction notices and on Tuesday morning most structures and tents had ben removed and most of the protestors had left.

So that is all for this post, I promise.

Peace,

Adam Dietrich

 

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